Materials from TechDays Netherlands 2015

Monday, August 31, 2015

Oops! This was sitting in my queue for several months now, and I just noticed it needs to be published. But better late than never I guess. Here goes: I've been lucky enough to be invited to speak at TechDays Netherlands again this year. This time I was asked to do four talks on some of my favorite subjects -- performance optimization, debugging, and diagnostics. Same as last year, the conference was impeccably organized. I'm really looking forward to next year's TechDays :-) In the meantime, here are the materials from my talks. Making .NET Applications Faster My usual favorite on improving...
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Creating Smaller, But Still Usable, Dumps of .NET Applications

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

MiniDumper is born. It is an open source library and command-line tool that can generate dump files of .NET processes. However, unlike standard tools such as Procdump, MiniDumper has three modes of operation: Full memory dumps (analogous to Procdump's -ma option). This is a complete dump of the process' memory, which includes the CLR heap but also a bunch of unnecessary information if you're mostly working with .NET applications. For example, a full memory dump will contain the binary code for all loaded modules, the unmanaged heap data, and a lot more. Heap-only dumps (no Procdump analog). This is a dump that contains the...
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Obtaining the CoreCLR DAC DLL for Windows Phone

Monday, July 6, 2015

Three years ago I blogged about obtaining SOS.dll and mscordacwks.dll indirectly from the Microsoft KB websites in case you only have a dump from the production system but can't gain access to copy these files over. (Reminder: SOS.dll is a WinDbg extension for debugging .NET processes and dump files. The DAC, or mscordacwks.dll, is a helper library used by SOS to access the inner workings of a specific CLR version's data structures. The DAC is also used by ClrMD, a managed library that provides an API replacement for the SOS extension commands.) It turns out that for Windows Phone applications (using the Windows Phone...

Wrapping Up DevWeek 2015

Thursday, April 2, 2015

Just a couple of months ago, I agreed to deliver eight breakout sessions and a full-day workshop at DevWeek 2015. And no, I don't have any regrets -- but it was definitely a very packed week with lots of room changes and, more importantly, context switches from one topic to another. If you've been to DevWeek this year, I'm sure you enjoyed it: it's getting better year over year, and this is my third one so far. Below you can find the materials for my eight sessions. If you've been to my workshop and haven't got the materials, please contact...

SDP Workshop: Monitoring .NET Performance with ETW

Thursday, January 22, 2015

I've been doing .NET performance workshops at the SDP for 4 years now, and this year I thought it was time for a change. The traditional workshop used to be about a variety of commercial performance measurement tools, such as the Visual Studio profiler, and unfortunately I wasn't able to offer any labs, so it wasn't really a hands-on workshop. This time I decided to rewrite 90% of the materials and focus only on ETW tools. Here's the rough agenda of the workshop -- I'm pretty happy with the results! Introduction to semantic logging and ETW Capturing kernel ETW events with xperf...
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Diagnosing Native Memory Leaks with ETW and WPA

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

As a followup to my previous post on native memory leaks, here's a quick walkthrough for diagnosing memory leaks using Event Tracing for Windows. The process is fairly simple. The Windows heap manager is instrumented with ETW traces for each memory allocation and deallocation. If you capture those over a period of time (when your application is leaking memory), you can get a nice report of which blocks were allocated during the trace period and haven't been freed. If you also ask ETW to capture the call stack for allocation events, you can see where the application is allocating...
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Native Memory Leak Diagnostics with Visual Studio 2015

Monday, December 1, 2014

The Current Landscape of Native Memory Diagnostics Leak diagnostics is a nasty business in native applications. There have been many attempts at solving this problem automatically. To name a few: The CRT Debug Heap (which is no longer used by default in Visual Studio 2015! - See update below.) can help identify memory leaks by associating each allocation with additional data on the allocating source file and line number. At program exit (or whenever a special CRT function is called), all blocks that haven't been freed are printed out. This has been around forever. The problem is that you need to...
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Why Lug a Laptop When an iPad Is More Than Enough

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

I don't go to conferences as an attendee as much as I used to, and that means I'm losing my organization skills at what to bring when I'm going to attend sessions all day. Theoretically, you need a laptop and a tablet and a phone and a bunch of cables and chargers and external battery packs and connectors and adapters -- how else could you survive a full day packed with sessions and do some urgent work to put out fires if necessary? Turns out, I can pretty much do everything I need on my iPad, if I'm willing...
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TechEd Europe 2014: Mastering IntelliTrace in Development and Production

Monday, October 27, 2014

I'm flying to TechEd Europe tomorrow, and decided to run an experiment and post my slides and demos before the session. Why the weird timing? Well, after giving the schedule a cursory glance, there are so many great sessions! It's really hard to pick a session based on the short conference abstracts, and I wouldn't want anyone to come to my session if they aren't absolutely sure it's a topic they care about. My talk is titled Mastering IntelliTrace in Development and Production. I love IntelliTrace and use it a lot, but it still remains a fairly obscure Visual Studio...
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DevConnections 2014: IntelliTrace, Diagnostics Hub, and .NET Production Debugging

Saturday, September 20, 2014

I'm flying back home from DevConnections 2014, which was great! Vegas was hot and dry as usual, but I actually managed to carve out some time in my schedule to see KA, which was really nice. (Plus, the conference was at the Aria resort, which is located smack in the middle of the strip, and is overall much nicer than Mandalay Bay where we were last year. I really liked the hotel room automation control. For example, I had an alarm clock set up to open the curtains, turn on the TV to a quiet music channel, and even...
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