USDT Probe Support in BPF/BCC

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

BPF is the next Linux tracing superpower, and its potential just keeps growing. The BCC project just merged my latest PR, which introduces USDT probe support in BPF programs. Before we look at the details, here's an example of what it means: # trace -p $(pidof node) 'u:node:http__server__request "%s %s (from %s:%d)" arg5, arg6, arg3, arg4' TIME PID COMM FUNC - 04:50:44 22185 node http__server__request GET /foofoo (from ::1:51056) 04:50:46 22185 node http__server__request GET / (from ::1:51056) ^C Yep, that's Node.js running...
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Two New eBPF Tools: memleak and argdist

Sunday, February 14, 2016

Warning: This post requires a bit of background. I strongly recommend Brendan Gregg's introduction to eBPF and bcc. With that said, the post below describes two new bcc-based tools, which you can use directly without perusing the implementation details. A few weeks ago, I started experimenting with eBPF. In a nutshell, eBPF (introduced in Linux kernel 3.19 and further improved in 4.x kernels) allows you to attach verifiably-safe programs to arbitrary functions in the kernel or a user process. These little programs, which execute in kernel mode, can collect performance information, trace diagnostic data, and aggregate statistics that are then...
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Shared Memory Queue, Adaptive pthread_mutex, and Dynamic Tracing

Friday, January 22, 2016

This blog post is also on GitHub in its entirety. If you prefer to read it there along with the code, I won't mind. Go ahead. In one of my recent training classes, I was asked to demonstrate some practical uses of shared memory. My knee-jerk reply was that shared memory can be used for inter-process communication and message-passing. In fact, most IPC mechanisms are based on shared memory in their implementation. The question was whether it's worth the effort to build a message-passing interface on top of shared memory queues, or whether sockets or pipes could produce a better result...
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