More on MiniDumper: Getting the Right Memory Pages for .NET Analysis

Wednesday, September 30, 2015

In my previous post on MiniDumper, I promised to explain in more detail how it figures out which memory ranges are required for .NET heap analysis. This is an interesting story, actually, because I tried a couple of approaches that failed before coming up with the final idea. Basically, I knew that a dump with full memory contains way more information than is necessary for .NET dump analysis. Even if you need the entire .NET heap available, you typically don't need a bunch of other memory ranges: executable code, Win32 heaps, unused regions of thread stacks, and so much more. My...
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Materials from TechDays Netherlands 2015

Monday, August 31, 2015

Oops! This was sitting in my queue for several months now, and I just noticed it needs to be published. But better late than never I guess. Here goes: I've been lucky enough to be invited to speak at TechDays Netherlands again this year. This time I was asked to do four talks on some of my favorite subjects -- performance optimization, debugging, and diagnostics. Same as last year, the conference was impeccably organized. I'm really looking forward to next year's TechDays :-) In the meantime, here are the materials from my talks. Making .NET Applications Faster My usual favorite on improving...

Creating Smaller, But Still Usable, Dumps of .NET Applications

Wednesday, August 19, 2015

MiniDumper is born. It is an open source library and command-line tool that can generate dump files of .NET processes. However, unlike standard tools such as Procdump, MiniDumper has three modes of operation: Full memory dumps (analogous to Procdump's -ma option). This is a complete dump of the process' memory, which includes the CLR heap but also a bunch of unnecessary information if you're mostly working with .NET applications. For example, a full memory dump will contain the binary code for all loaded modules, the unmanaged heap data, and a lot more. Heap-only dumps (no Procdump analog). This is a dump that contains the...

A Neat Stack Corruption, or Reverse P/Invoke Structure Packing with Output Parameters

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

I know, I'm working hard on beating my record for longest post title ever. I also thought of adding a random Win32 API to the title, say CoMarshalInterThreadInterfaceInStream or AccessCheckByTypeResultListAndAuditAlarmByHandle. But I didn't, so here we are. What was I saying? Oh yeah, a neat stack corruption I spent a couple of hours chasing last week. I was doing my usual reverse P/Invoke where I call a Windows API and pass a delegate as a callback. There's a bunch of APIs in Win32 that take callbacks, but for the sake of this post let's take a look at a very simple example...

Obtaining the CoreCLR DAC DLL for Windows Phone

Monday, July 6, 2015

Three years ago I blogged about obtaining SOS.dll and mscordacwks.dll indirectly from the Microsoft KB websites in case you only have a dump from the production system but can't gain access to copy these files over. (Reminder: SOS.dll is a WinDbg extension for debugging .NET processes and dump files. The DAC, or mscordacwks.dll, is a helper library used by SOS to access the inner workings of a specific CLR version's data structures. The DAC is also used by ClrMD, a managed library that provides an API replacement for the SOS extension commands.) It turns out that for Windows Phone applications (using the Windows Phone...

Wrapping Up DevWeek 2015

Thursday, April 2, 2015

Just a couple of months ago, I agreed to deliver eight breakout sessions and a full-day workshop at DevWeek 2015. And no, I don't have any regrets -- but it was definitely a very packed week with lots of room changes and, more importantly, context switches from one topic to another. If you've been to DevWeek this year, I'm sure you enjoyed it: it's getting better year over year, and this is my third one so far. Below you can find the materials for my eight sessions. If you've been to my workshop and haven't got the materials, please contact...

Diagnosing Native Memory Leaks with ETW and WPA

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

As a followup to my previous post on native memory leaks, here's a quick walkthrough for diagnosing memory leaks using Event Tracing for Windows. The process is fairly simple. The Windows heap manager is instrumented with ETW traces for each memory allocation and deallocation. If you capture those over a period of time (when your application is leaking memory), you can get a nice report of which blocks were allocated during the trace period and haven't been freed. If you also ask ETW to capture the call stack for allocation events, you can see where the application is allocating...

Native Memory Leak Diagnostics with Visual Studio 2015

Monday, December 1, 2014

The Current Landscape of Native Memory Diagnostics Leak diagnostics is a nasty business in native applications. There have been many attempts at solving this problem automatically. To name a few: The CRT Debug Heap (which is no longer used by default in Visual Studio 2015! - See update below.) can help identify memory leaks by associating each allocation with additional data on the allocating source file and line number. At program exit (or whenever a special CRT function is called), all blocks that haven't been freed are printed out. This has been around forever. The problem is that you need to...

Garbage Collection and .NET Debugging at Build Stuff

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

I spent most of last week at Build Stuff, a really cool software conference in Vilnius, Lithuania. The conference was great with a really exciting atmosphere: energized, passionate developers having conversations and playing table tennis in the hallways during the day, and drinking lots of beer in the evenings. Even the weather was quite nice -- there was only a little snow, and temperatures didn't drop below -1 Celsius, which means we could walk around the old town's historical landmarks; grab some sushi, ribs, and beer; and do some window shopping. So, a great success! I was invited to deliver...
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A Loop of Nested Exceptions

Monday, November 17, 2014

It was a pretty incredible coincidence. Only a few days apart, I had to tackle two problems that had to do with nested exception handlers. Specifically, an infinite loop of nested exceptions that led to a stack overflow. And that's a pretty fatal combination. A stack overflow is an extremely nasty error to debug; a nested exception means the exception handler encountered an exception, which can't be pretty; and to add insult to injury, a stack corruption was also involved behind the scenes. Read on to learn some more about the trickiness of diagnosing nested exceptions and what can...