Materials from TechDays Netherlands 2015

August 31, 2015

Oops! This was sitting in my queue for several months now, and I just noticed it needs to be published. But better late than never I guess. Here goes: I've been lucky enough to be invited to speak at TechDays Netherlands again this year. This time I was asked to do four talks on some of my favorite subjects -- performance optimization, debugging, and diagnostics. Same as last year, the conference was impeccably organized. I'm really looking forward to next year's TechDays :-) In the meantime, here are the materials from my talks. Making .NET Applications Faster My usual favorite on improving...
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Creating Smaller, But Still Usable, Dumps of .NET Applications

August 19, 2015

MiniDumper is born. It is an open source library and command-line tool that can generate dump files of .NET processes. However, unlike standard tools such as Procdump, MiniDumper has three modes of operation: Full memory dumps (analogous to Procdump's -ma option). This is a complete dump of the process' memory, which includes the CLR heap but also a bunch of unnecessary information if you're mostly working with .NET applications. For example, a full memory dump will contain the binary code for all loaded modules, the unmanaged heap data, and a lot more. Heap-only dumps (no Procdump analog). This is a dump that contains the...
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A Neat Stack Corruption, or Reverse P/Invoke Structure Packing with Output Parameters

August 18, 2015

I know, I'm working hard on beating my record for longest post title ever. I also thought of adding a random Win32 API to the title, say CoMarshalInterThreadInterfaceInStream or AccessCheckByTypeResultListAndAuditAlarmByHandle. But I didn't, so here we are. What was I saying? Oh yeah, a neat stack corruption I spent a couple of hours chasing last week. I was doing my usual reverse P/Invoke where I call a Windows API and pass a delegate as a callback. There's a bunch of APIs in Win32 that take callbacks, but for the sake of this post let's take a look at a very simple example...
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Why You Have to Learn Modern C++

August 15, 2015

The C++ language many of us are using today goes back more than thirty years. You might be using some “newer” features, such as templates or the standard library, which have been standardized around 1998 – the previous millennium. Since 1998, C++ has seen two major international standards – C++ 11 and C++ 14, and work is in progress on another major revision to be published in 2017. Over the last few years, C++ developers all over the world are transitioning to the new, modern C++. It’s not just a matter of language features or library APIs. It’s a matter...
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