WPF Command Confirmation

October 25, 2012

In the last post, I introduced you to my DynamicGridFormationBehavior, which gives you the ability to dynamically change a grid's formation, using only Xaml. In this post, I want to introduce you to another behavior, called ConfirmationBehavior. First let's set the context. Assume that we have an application that handles customers' information, and allows CRUD operations on it. The client asked that before any critical operation on the data (deleting a customer for example), a confirmation message will appear. If you're following the MVVM pattern in your WPF applications (and you should), you will probably end up...
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Changing WPF Grid Structure Dynamically

October 19, 2012

In an application I was working on recently, I needed to implement a split screen, like those on the closed-circuit cameras monitors. Usually, a simple Grid or a UniformGrid would do the trick, but in this case, the requirement was to allow the user to dynamically change the grid's structure. The following screenshots shows the grid's structure when the user chooses to display two, three, or four screens, respectively: As you can see, different user selections requires entirely different grid structure, with different number of...
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Intern Pool Improvements between Various .NET Framework versions

October 8, 2012

As you probably know, .NET supports string interning for better memory usage of .NET applications. String literals are automatically interned by the runtime, while any other string can be interned by an explicit call to String.Intern. I will not go into details regarding string interning, if you are not familiar with the concept, you can get started by reading the MSDN documentation for the String.Intern method. In this post, I would like to write about one of the implementation details of the .NET intern pool, specifically, where it is stored and how the storage strategy was changed between recent...
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Introduction

October 7, 2012

Hey, my name is Moshe Levi, and I'm a consultant at Sela. For the past 3 years, I have blogged at my own domain, but I guess that by writing here, I will make the stuff I write available to more people, which is why I started blogging in the first place. I do intend to publish each new post on both sites. I started my career over 10 years ago, developing with C++ on Linux, but for the last 5 years I have worked almost entirely with C# on various Windows's OSs. I will write about...
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