Dear blog, it’s been a while since my last post

Monday, January 16, 2012

If you’ve been wondering where I disappeared to in the last couple of weeks, and if you are still waiting anxiously for my next post about WCF 4.5, fear not, I’m here, I’m alive, and I’m still kicking. It’s been quite a rough month, as I have been occupied knee deep in home renovations. If you’ve ever dealt with contractors, technicians, and handyman, you know the type of frustration I’m talking about. Between re-tiling my floors, replacing my kitchen cabinets, and re-painting my entire home, I also managed to find the time to deliver some courses on...

Windows HPC with burst to Windows Azure training kit refresh

Wednesday, September 14, 2011

The Windows HPC with burst to Windows Azure training kit is a set of sample labs that demonstrate how to use Windows HPC Server 2008 R2 with Windows Azure to harness the power of Windows Azure compute nodes for the processing of high-performance computing (HPC) algorithms. The first training kit, which also included a white paper, was released on May 2011 and included several samples that demonstrated the features of Windows HPC Server 2008 R2 SP1. The updated training kit demonstrates the features of the newly released SP2, such as a RESTful API for accessing the scheduler service,...

Did you mean the hpcpack command?

Thursday, May 19, 2011

Did you reach this post because you are a frequent reader of my blog? or did you get here because you are looking for the Windows HPC Server 2008 R2 command called hpcpack? The hpcpack is a command that is used in Windows HPC Server 2008 R2 (SP1 currently) to create deployment packages that are installed in Azure worker nodes. With the hpcpack you can create a .zip file that contains the content you wish to deploy, upload the package to the Azure storage where all HPC application packages are stored (it is a special blob created...

How many transactions can you see in the following picture?

Wednesday, April 27, 2011

Lately, I mentioned I would  write about Windows HPC Server R2 SP1 and its integration with Windows Azure. Before we get to the basics of how to use the two together, take a look at the following image and answer the following questions (click image to enlarge): I’ve started one large Azure instance under my HPC cluster and ran it for 3 hours. Why do I see 12 computing hours (line 1)? Why are there an additional 6 computing hours (line 2) showing in my bill? ...

Published article: Windows HPC with Burst to Windows Azure: Application Models and Data Considerations

Thursday, April 14, 2011

I’ve written before about the white paper Yaniv and I have been writing for MSDN. I’m pleased to announce that the white paper has been published and can be downloaded from the Microsoft download website. I will continue posting on the subject of Windows HPC Server 2008 R2 and Windows Azure, as we continue to write demos for this environment, and (spoiler…) upgrading our white paper for the coming release of Windows HPC Server 2008 R2 SP2. So if you’re interested in the integration of Windows HPC Server 2008 R2 and Windows Azure (also referred to...

Posting about Windows HPC Server 2008 R2 SP1

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

In the past couple of weeks, Yaniv and I have been working on a white paper for Microsoft regarding the integration of Windows HPC Server 2008 R2 SP1 with Windows Azure. If you’re not familiar with HPC (High Performance Computing), and with the Windows HPC Server 2008 R2, I suggest you start by looking at the Windows HPC Server 2008 website, and keep following Yaniv’s blog and mine, as we’ll write more about this subject in the coming weeks. For the entire explanation on how Windows HPC Server integrates with Windows Azure, I suggest you read the...

Time to connect to your Azure Storage account

Thursday, March 31, 2011

Sometimes when you try to connect to your Azure storage account you might get the following error message: “Server failed to authenticate the request. Make sure the value of Authorization header is formed correctly including the signature.” Searching the Internet for the cause of the problem will probably lead you to check your Internet connection, the storage name and key, your Azure account ID etc… But there’s one thing that you should check first – your machine’s date and time !! Apparently, when you connect to your Azure Storage account, the request is sent with...